Fat Steve's Blatherings

Tuesday, June 07, 2005

Interesting Distinction

Summary:
      A Journalism professor and former journalist says that there's at least two kinds of journalism, namely "day-to-day" and "investigative."   What do reporters think the discinction is?

In Depth:
      In re my previous post, "acline" (Andrew R. Cline, Ph.D.) says:
We teach students to be arrogant when we teach them to elevate investigative reporting over solid day-to-day reporting.

      I find the distinction between "investigative reporting" and "day-to-day" reporting quite interesting.  Here's a question: do reporters seek to tell the truth when they do "day-to-day" reporting?  I presume they do.  So what is the difference between "day-to-day" and "investigative" journalism?

      I ask this quite seriously.  My guess, which I haven't tried to confirm, is that in "day-to-day" journalism, the reporters presume that they will be told the truth, while in "investigative" journalism, they expect to be lied to.  If so, what leads them to the conclusion that story A is one they'll be able to get without doubting people, while story B is one where someone will try to con them.  And how do they decide whom to trust?

      Perhaps I'm completely wrong about how journalists draw the distinction.  But the fact that an Assistant Professor of Journalism apparently thinks there's more than one kind of journalism (aside from distinctions among subject focus, such as sports, national affairs, etc.), this is fascinating to me.

THE HOUSE OF SAUD MUST BE DESTROYED -- AND WILL BE!

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